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1918 Flu Epidemic More Deadly Than Germans
Not available online
Title1918 Flu Epidemic More Deadly Than Germans
AbstractShort article details the involvement of Camp Funston and Fort Riley with the spread of the Spanish Flu in 1918. "Since Fort Riley was a cavalry outpost, there were hundreds of horses and mules also living on the base--hundreds of animals producing tons of excrement. The most efficient way to dispose of the dung was to burn it. Such a fire had been set on March 9 when a ferocious dust storm kicked up that same day. The dust combined with the smoke of the burning dung heaps blackened the skies in Kansas--'dead black,' some said." Shortly after this incident, men started to come down with the flu. "More Americans died as a result of the Spanish Flu than were killed in the First and Second World Wars, the Korean War and the Vietnam War combined."
DateSpring 2005
SourceKansas Journal of Military History
LocationMVSC Q 978.1 K1656 2005 Spring
Volume1
Number1
Page36-37
SubjectInfluenza
Communicable diseases
Diseases
Local SubjectCamp Funston, Kansas
Fort Riley
World War I
Influenza Epidemic
Epidemics
IllustrationsYes
Item TypeMagazine article
Access This ItemThis document is not available online. You may come to the Missouri Valley Room to view it or request a photocopy from the Library's Document Delivery service. http://www.kclibrary.org/copy-requests
Item ID218409
CONTENTdm number38099
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