Title: Letter to Friend Dixon

Description: This letter is written from a hospital room. Letter writer describes how he feels about war and the Emancipation Proclamation. It is incomplete with last page(s) missing. Full text of the letter is transcribed below as written. Spelling and lack of punctuation left as in letters.

Date: January 26, 1863

Item Type: Archival Material

Collection: Dixon and Jordan Family Papers (SC15-9)
See finding aid: http://localhistory.kclibrary.org/u?/Local,36941

Location: SC15-9, Box 1, Folder 36

Subject: Correspondence; Soldiers;

Local Subject: Jordan Family; 112th Illinois Infantry Regiment; 47th Illinois Infantry Regiment; Civil War; Dixon Family;

Digital Format: JPEG

Transcription: Lexington Kentuckey Jan 26th, 1863

Friend Dixon

I now seat myself to answer your letter which came to hand a few days ago it was read with great plasure and ind interest. Letters are but marks placed upon paper but there is nothing looked after with more interest and eagerness by the soldiers than a letter from home. Your letter found me quite well although I have been quite sick but am now able to eat my allowance. I am writing this letter within the dim walls of a Hospital No 3 in this place there are about 250 sick in this Hospital the room that I am in has 40 men but none

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dangerously sick we have quite a no with broken limbs amongst them is Andrew Fantz from about or near slackwater he broke his leg by wrestling with George Nicholas on Sunday last as yesterday I think that he will soon be able to be around again as the Doctor says that it is not badly broken. I expected that we would stay at this place all winter but a part of the brigade has left and I expect that we will soon be on the move. Well we are doing but very little good here and if we can be of any more service to the government somewhere else than her I hope we may move soon for I for one am tired of this awful war which has cost so many lives and no one but some supernatural power knows or can tell how many more is to

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suffer and die yet and all on account of a few (well I hardly know what to call them) but something in human form not that I have more to excite my feelings than thousands of others but you can hardly imagine how I feel when I take a few sober thoughts on this subject I sometimes think that there aught to be a place of everlasting torment for such as those who go contrary to their own mind and dictate of conscience and I hold that the leaders of this rebellion are men who knows right from wrong but they are a class that have shown for years that they mean to rule as ruin they have come to the point at last to ruin in a great degree but not yet to rule. I for one amongst thousands of others am willing to leave all that is near and dear to me

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rather than to have them do the ruling. There ar a great many men in the 112th and also in other Reg’ts that are down on the Presidents Emancipation Proclimation and talk what I call real secessionism. I often have a few words with them but you know sharp engagements scarcely every last long as I begin to throw hot shot the first thing. The old adage is this if neither words nor grass will do we must try what virtue there is in stones. I tell them that we had better have a fight amongst ourselves and marcilize one army there are a great many men in our Reg’t which go about gassing and blowing and saying that we might as well give up first as last for we cannot conquer them. Now these men I call shortsighted fools but you know that [end of letter]

Barcode: lexington1, lexington2, lexingtonp31, lexingtonp4

Repository: Missouri Valley Special Collections, Kansas City Public Library, Kansas City, Missouri

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